The Morning Measure: Tough Transportation Decisions

Nov 2, 2010
rgf_default

 

As a follow-up to yesterday’s post about the economy today’s Morning Measure asks a tough question: in a very strained economic environment how should limited transportation funds be allocated?

What metrics should be used to make such decisions? Should policy makers consider a strict cost-benefit analysis of the most immediate bang for the buck or should they take a long-term consideration of investment that will make the area in question more economically and environmentally sustainable but that is unlikely to yield immediate tangible results that politicians desire? When if at all should social justice come into the equation?

It’s clear that transportation systems across the country are highly strapped for cash including Metro the Washington region’s largest transit provider which faces another large budget gap this year. It’s also clear that much more investment is necessary to meet the RF targets for accessibility. Where will that additional funding come from? In a previous Measure we noted that alternative funding options for transportation are necessary given the political impalpability of raising the gas tax. If and when a source of that additional funding is identified how should decisions on what it is used for be judged?

 
Back to news

Related News

  • UMD Biopark
    News

    Regional organizations release plan to boost exports

    January 12, 2017

    The Greater Washington Metro Export Plan, released at the January meeting of the COG Board of Directors, calls for increasing the region’s participation in the...

  • News

    D.C. Region's Economic Growth Depends on STEM Jobs, COG Reports

    October 25, 2016

    Developing a skilled workforce to fill STEM-intensive occupations in seven economic clusters will help drive metropolitan Washington’s economic growth over the...